David Macaulay: Mill Times DVD

$24.99
Item #: WB2532
This animated program centers on a small New England community similar to Pawtucket, Rhode Island, where Samuel Slater established America's first textile mill. Live action hosted by David Macaulay, takes viewers from Manchester, England, to Lowell, Massachusetts, explaining technological changes that transformed the making of textiles, a key component of the Industrial Revolution sweeping across Europe and America in the ... More
In Stock & Ready to Ship
Select Format:

Quantity:

This animated program centers on a small New England community similar to Pawtucket, Rhode Island, where Samuel Slater established America's first textile mill. Live action hosted by David Macaulay, takes viewers from Manchester, England, to Lowell, Massachusetts, explaining technological changes that transformed the making of textiles, a key component of the Industrial Revolution sweeping across Europe and America in the late 18th century.

Producer: Unicorn Projects Inc.
Production Year: 2001
Copyright Year: 2001
Number of Discs: 1
Length: 60 minutes
Language Track: English
Audio Format: Stereo
Aspect Ratio: 4x3 Full Screen

4 Reviews
B
B.P.
Anonymous User
5.0 star rating
07/17/20
Very Educational
Review by B.P. on 07/17/20 review stating Very Educational
You cant do better than Mill Times when discussing this era. It is fun and educational.
R
Raider
Anonymous User
4.0 star rating
07/17/20
Great look into early mills.
Review by Raider on 07/17/20 review stating Great look into early mills.
This is perfect for a classroom that explores early American mills. The kids like the animation. Quite entertaining.
R
Room C.
Anonymous User
5.0 star rating
07/17/20
Mill Times for the classroom
Review by Room C. on 07/17/20 review stating Mill Times for the classroom
Students need to SEE the Industrial Revolution, not just read about it. This is a great resource for showing them mills, water wheels, steam engines, some of the hazards of industrialization, the key people involved, etc. And for any fans of the Liberty Kids series, there is a fictional LK-ish cartoon woven into the documentary portions to highlight the arrival in the states of machinery and the impact on early America. And for frustrated instructors who wish classroom documentaries were less boring, Macaulay speaks clearly, at the right pace, not too fast, and not too much ... and with just the right amount of humor. My students LOVED it!
D
Digee
Anonymous User
5.0 star rating
07/17/20
Mill Times is another excellent special
Review by Digee on 07/17/20 review stating Mill Times is another excellent special
David Macaulay hosts another romp through history in his PBS special called Mill Times. Like Roman City, Pyramid, Cathedral, and Castle, Macaulay uses animation and video to show how people interacted with the buildings and machinery of past ages. Macaulay presents many of his specials through the eyes of people such as leaders, workers, and politicians. This makes these specials a perfect avenue of understanding the social sciences. Viewers will learn how wool, yarn, fabric, rivers, factories, and steam power shaped mill times. Footage of restored working mills help explain how past people crafted textiles. It is interesting to learn how mills came from England to America and impacted the people of the modern times.Macaulay presents vivid, factual, and concise information about the history of mills that will benefit people of any age. This special truly coveys how mills have shaped where and how people live today. I plan to show this DVD when teaching American industrialization and the rise of cities. These are some questions that a viewer can easily answer as he or she views this DVD: 1. What was the most common material that people in New England once used to make clothing? wool 2. A loom is used to create fabric or cloth. 3. What was the energy source that once powered early mills? water 4. What was the name of the fictional mill that Josiah Greshan and Shaddrack built? Huntington Mill 5. An early mill could spin the same amount of material as how many people? 50 people 6. How did mill owners access river energy? Owners built dams 7. In what year did Samuel Slater build the first American mill? 1789 8. The factory system began employing hundreds of workers. 9. In what city of Massachusetts did Lowell build his famous textile mill? Lowell 10. What did Lowell do to attract farm girls to work in his factories? Lowell offered good paying jobs and ensured that girls would not drink alcohol and would go to church. He also housed the girls in boarding houses and fed them very well. 11. What day of the week did Lowell girls get off? Sunday 12. What did some factory workers begin doing when unsafe working conditions, low wages, and long hours became unbearable? They formed unions or went on strike. 13. What name did Slater give to the mill he built in 1806? Slatersville 14. What was the new source of energy that made it possible to run a machine anytime and anyplace? Steam 15. Why did many New England mills begin moving south? Steam replaced the necessity of river power, cotton was close by, and labor was cheaper. Mill Times is an excellent DVD special that will give people of all ages new insight in the development of the textile industry and how it impacts the modern world.


Virtual Catalog